Sites of Special Scientific Interest (SSSIs)

These are sites of interest for their flora, fauna, geological, or physiographical features. This is a statutory designation.


17 SSSIs exist in Birmingham and the Black Country

 

Sites of Special Scientific Interest Map

1. SUTTON PARK (BIRMINGHAM)

Sutton Park is a tract of wild, unenclosed country within an urban area.
It contains the largest and richest areas of ancient woodland, heath and wetland in the County


Source: Natural England

2. EDGBASTON POOL (BIRMINGHAM)

Edgbaston Pool lies in the valley of the Chad Brook on glacial sands and gravels overlying Keuper sandstones. The woodland has a good structure giving
cover for birds and a range of dead timber with associated fungi.


The site has developed a diverse semi-natural community.


Source: Natural England

 

3. WREN’S NEST (DUDLEY)

This site is of exceptional palaeontological importance particularly for rocks of Wenlock age. This internationally famous locality has yielded both macro- and micro-fossils of superb preservation, great variety and in great abundance.


Wren’s Nest is one of the most notable geological locations in the British Isles.


Source: Natural England

 

4. FENS POOLS (DUDLEY)

Fens Pools is the best amphibian site known in the West Midlands. Amphibians inhabit the whole site, using the pools for breeding


The Great Crested Newt (Triturus cristatus) population is one of the largest so far recorded in Britain.


Source: Natural England

 

5. ILLEY PASTURES (DUDLEY)

Illey Pastures SSSI consists of two fields of species rich unimproved neutral grassland situated to the south of Halesowen.


The site contains one of the richest grassland floras in the County and is of particular importance since this habitat has become very scarce nationally.


Source: Natural England

 

6. TURNER’S HILL (DUDLEY)

Turner’s Hill provides important exposures of a sequence of strata of late Silurian age spanning the Ludfordian-Pridoli boundary.


This rock sequence is rarely so well exposed and this locality is therefore of considerable importance in understanding the nature of late Silurian geology in Britain.


Source: Natural England

 

7. DOULTON’S CLAYPIT (DUDLEY)

Doulton’s Claypit demonstrates a series of strata through the Middle Coal Measures laid down in the Upper Carboniferous period c. 310 million years ago.


This is the best exposure of the Productive Coal Formation in the Midlands coalfield.


Source: Natural England

 

8. KETLEY CLAYPIT (DUDLEY)

An outstanding section through the upper part of the Etruria Formation of the Carboniferous Period, showing the junction with the overlying Halesowen Formation.


Source: Natural England

 

9. BREWIN’S CANAL SECTION (DUDLEY)

An outstanding section through the upper part of the Etruria Formation of the Carboniferous Period, showing the junction with the overlying Halesowen Formation.


Source: Natural England

 

10. BROMSGROVE ROAD CUTTING (DUDLEY)

This is the best available exposure of the Basal Sandstone Member of the Halesowen Formation, (Upper Carboniferous).


This site provides important evidence to help the environmental interpretation of Britain during the Westphalian Epoch.


Source: Natural England

 

11. CANNOCK EXTENSION CANAL (WALSALL)

The Cannock Extension is a terminal side branch of the Wyrley and Essington Canal extending northwards for 2.5 km towards Norton Canes.


A total of thirty four aquatic plants have been recorded from the canal, making it the richest known waterway of its type in Staffordshire and the West Midlands, and placing it high within the national canal network series.


Source: Natural England

 

12. CLAYHANGER (WALSALL)

Clayhanger includes a wide range of wetland habitats from open water through swamp and fen communities to species-rich marshy grassland which adjoin areas of neutral and acidic grassland.


Habitat diversity, well developed stands of emergent vegetation, and species restricted in their national distribution combine to make Clayhanger one of the best wetland sites in the county.


Source: Natural England

 

13. HAY HEAD QUARRY (WALSALL)

This is the type locality for the Barr Limestone, a lens of rock at the base of the Wenlock Shale (Coalbrookdale Formation).


The site has been the subject of considerable research since the beginning of the 19th century and remains an outstanding source of material for the students of Silurian marine faunas.


Source: Natural England

 

14. STUBBERS GREEN BOG (WALSALL)

Stubbers Green Bog is a small wetland site in Walsall comprising a shallow pool with fringing valley mire and swamp communities which have developed in a hollow, presumed to be caused by mining subsidence.


This combination of habitats is poorly represented in the county and
valley mire is scarce nationally.


Source: Natural England

 

15. DAW END RAILWAY CUTTING (WALSALL)

The old quarry and railway cuttings at Daw End provide excellent exposures of Wenlock Shale (Coalbrookdale Formation) and the overlying Wenlock Limestone which were deposited during the Silurian Period about 410 million years ago. These are the best
exposures available in Britain for this particular group of rocks.


Source: Natural England

 

16. JOCKEY FIELDS (WALSALL)

The site consists of a number of low-lying fields in a stream valley. Variations in wetness and management have produced a range of vegetation types including well-grazed damp pasture, neglected grassland, fen and mire.

 

The variety of habitats found at Jockey Fields, together with the large size of the site, the presence of a number of plant species rare in the West Midlands and the bird interest make it very important in the County.


Source: Natural England

 

17. SWAN POOL AND THE SWAG (WALSALL)

Swan Pool and The Swag are two pools, linked by a culvert under Stubbers Green Road, Walsall.

 

They are important as their associated reedbeds hold the largest roost for swallows and other hirundines in the West Midlands County


Source: Natural England